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Selected Medical Imaging Lecture Series: Session 1

Post time: 2014-07-07 11:06:55      Page views:

Course Description

       The “Tsinghua SMILES” course consists of a series of week-long lectures spanning across several advanced areas of biomedical imaging.  Each self-contained lecture series will focus on a special topic that will help the students gain an in-depth understanding of an advanced subject.  While the specific objectives of each lecture series will be determined by the instructor, all series are expected to reflect a central theme – bring the state-of-the-art biomedical imaging technologies to Tsinghua students.

       Each week-long lecture series contains approximately 6-10 contact hours with 3-5 lectures/sessions. These contact hours can be evenly distributed across a week (e.g., 2 contact hours per day), or condensed into a weekend, depending on the instructor’s schedule. The targeted audience will be college seniors and graduate students in imaging physics or biomedical engineering. Prerequisite includes essential biomedical imaging principles as well as advanced mathematics and physics. 

Session 1: Introduction to Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Methods (Prof. Gary Glover, July 5-8. everyday 9:30 am-11:30 am)

 

Course Schedule 07/05/14-07/08/14

Day 1-2

(Sat 07/05/14 – Sun 07/06/14)

Course Overview

Basics of fMRI

·     BOLD Contrast

·     Experimental Design

·     Statistics

·     Resting-state

·     DTI

Day 3 (Mon 07/07/14)

Advanced Topics of fMRI

·     Multi-model imaging (EEG, TMS, optogenetics, etc.)

·     Real-time fMRI & neuro feedbacks

·     Spinal cord fMRI

·     Multivariate analysis

Day 4 (Tue 07/08/14)

Journal Club (suggested topics)

·     Applications of machine learning approaches in fMRI 

·     Diffusion Tensor Imaging 

·     Investigations on genetic influence on fMRI 

·     High spatial-temporal resolution of fMRI 

·     Electrophysiology of fMRI 

·     Dynamics of functional connectivity & signal variability